A Look at Amor de Lejos & Latino Immigration Literature


In Crossing into America<: The New Literature of Immigration by Louis Gerard Mendoza, Subramanian Shankar, published in 2003, two English professors bring us narratives from recent immigrants:

A landmark collection capturing the complex experiences of America’s newest immigrants.

This breakthrough collection presents voices from the great second wave of American immigration. Mixing beautiful writing from celebrated authors such as Jamaica Kincaid, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Richard Rodriguez with striking selections from young writers, as well as diary entries and letters home from undocumented workers, Crossing into America presents a complex portrait of emerging America.

Since the immigration reform of 1965 removed many of the racial barriers in our immigration laws, the second wave of immigrants has transformed the face of the United States. Crossing into America includes stories and memoirs of writers born in Mexico, Cuba, Kashmir, the Philippines, South Africa, and Romania, among other places, as well as poignant reflections on the immigrant experience by the children of immigrants. The book also includes an accessible history of American immigration policy and an original and timely section of conversations with activists, artists, and journalists who work on the front lines of America’s immigrant battles.

Edited by two well-known specialists in immigrant literature—one an immigrant, one a child of immigrants—Crossing into America establishes a new canon of writing and is an essential resource for anyone interested in the future of America.

Contributors include: Teresa Acosta • Agha Shahid Ali • Julia Alvarez • Tara Bahrampour • Frank Chin • Sandra Cisneros • Andrei Codrescu • Martin Espada • Jessica Hagedorn • Maxine Hong Kingston • Jamaica Kincaid •Chang-Rae Lee • Frank McCourt • Richard Rodriguez

In “Amor de lejos: Latino (Im)migration Literatures,” B.V. Olguin notes, “Latino/a (im)migration narratives…often illustrate the traumatic aspects of displacement by focusing in part on how immigration, migration, exile, and colonization place people in a state of national limbo.”

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